Topic 2: Food as Part of Our Identity | OFPC

TRAINING

DAY 2 :           Food as Part of Our Identity

Purpose:                To create awareness of the food and beverage industry’s influences on food choices, its targeting of communities of color, and the role of government in encouraging or restricting these practices.

Objective:            Participants will:

  • Understand how food influences and shapes our identity.
  • Have a greater understanding about the role of corporations and government influencing what we eat and consume
  • Identify some specific instances when food and beverage corporations use culture to manipulate ethnic groups
  • Identify how the built environment influences what we eat and our food choice

Materials:             Flip chart, Markers, Big sheets of paper.

Colored markers/pencils.

Tape or head pins

Screen and Projector

Slides of food advertising from CANFIT

Time:                       120 minutes

Procedure:    Facilitator should show examples of advertisements that target youth and communities of color. To initiate the activity, distribute paper and colored markers to the participants to create or build their personal “food museum.” Participants will illustrate with drawings and/or words the foods that make up their life. They will also identify their feelings (smells, tastes, etc) associated with eating their cultural foods. Each participant will post his or her “food museum” up on the wall forming a “gallery walk”. Facilitate a discussion to debrief the experience highlighted in the food museum. Through this activity participants will understand the role of food in their family life, culture, and community.

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Time                         Activity

10 Min                    Welcome/Framing

To create awareness of the food and beverage industry’s influences on food choices, its targeting of communities of color, and the role of government in encouraging or restricting these practice

  • Go over the Agreements (From Lesson 1, Community Agreements)

10 Min  Group Check-in:

25 Min                    Food Museum Activity

  • Have participants break into groups of 2-4 individuals. Hand out markers and poster

paper to each group. Ensure that each member of the group has a poster paper to create their own “food museum”.

  • Facilitator asks participants to draw their “food museum”. Participants will illustrate with drawings and/or words the foods that make up their life. They will also identify their feelings (smells, tastes, etc) associated with eating their cultural food.
  • Encourage creativity. Participants can use different ways of expressing their feelings and ideas draw symbols, images, words that represent their food and culture. Offer some examples, i.e. “In my museum there are coconut palm trees providing shade in a hot humid day”. When they completed the activity ask

them to pin or tape their “food museum” poster to the wall

35 Min                    Gallery Tour

  • Encourage everyone to take a gallery tour of the “food museum” posters. Participants will mingle around and appreciate the different poster, similarities and differences.

The gallery tour shall be done in silence. Facilitator allots some time for comments and questions.

20 Min  De-brief and Discussion

  • What was it like to draw a “food museum”?
  • What was it like to see others’?
  • What does the activity tell us about the role of food in our lives and communities?
  • What are explicit influences on your food choices? (Answers: culture, religion, family, friends, climate, money, location, availability, limited food options, different distribution of resources in neighborhoods

Alternative/additional activity:

Participants can be divided in two groups. Some of them will show “food museum” posters of food deserts based on what is available in their neighborhoods. Use the same process outline above to do the food dessert museum poster. They should represent most common foods they have in their neighborhood, school, corner stores, and fast food restaurants. After the silent gallery tour, participants should share how they felt walking through the food museums vs. the food deserts. Encourage discussion about differences and why do those differences exist? What are some of their ideas why food deserts exist?

20 Min  Food Advertising—Culture and Identity Activity

Facilitator has questions written on a poster board ahead of time. Pose these questions to the generate dialogue. Inform participants the purpose of this activity is to create awareness of how the food and beverage targets communities of color and how it often influences our food choices. Your “food museum” poster shows some of your cultural foods and rituals.

  • Do any of those cultural habits and rituals have roots in commercial advertisement?
  • Have you seen or read advertisement that may encourage the sale of cultural foods? (list some of the items and list the companies that promote those ads.

Show CANFIT Power Point Presentation of advertisements included Facilitate dialogue and ask the following

  • What is your opinion about the slide presentation of food advertisement you have seen?
  • Who is this advertisement targeting?
  • How do they use play on race, gender, sexuality, etc. in the image and why?
  • Where do you most commonly see these types of advertisements?
  • In your opinion who are they targeting?
  • Should government and public policy restrict food advertisement and marketing?

15 Min  Evaluation

Create a list for both strengths and areas of improvement. Ask the group to list all the things they liked about the training and what they would change.

5 Min                       Check-out

Before the session ends, participants can take down their “food museums” and take them home, spurring conversations with family members and friends.